WIR #34: Poetics

Aristotle
Aristotle. The Pocket Aristotle. New York: Pocket Books Classic. Translated under the Editorship of W. D. Ross. Translation copyright © 1942 by Oxford University Press.


I finished this several days ago, but didn't bother to blog about it. Sorry. Good stuff. Very analytical, obviously. But that's what Aristotle was all about, wasn't he? If you've not read Aristotle's Poetics, I recommend that you do.

WIR #34: Poetics

Aristotle
Aristotle. The Pocket Aristotle. New York: Pocket Books Classic. Translated under the Editorship of W. D. Ross. Translation copyright © 1942 by Oxford University Press.


I am not reading this entire book, which contains selected chapters from several of Aristotle's works. Namely, Physics, Psychology, Metaphysics, Nicomachean Ethics, Politics, and Poetics. Rather, I intend to read only Poetics. I've read Poetics before, but I am wanting to read it again. It shouldn't take too long, I think, given that it's only 38 pages in this particular volume.

I rather like the Will Durant quote found on the back cover:

"Aristotle's creation of a new discipline of thought remains among the lasting achievements of the human mind. Every later age has drawn upon Aristotle and stood upon his shoulders to see the truth."

Saith the Blurb:

In this extraordinary volume of selections from Aristotle — culled from the monumental Oxford translation by authorities including W. D. Ross, Benjamin Jowett, and Ingram Bywater — editor Justin D. Kaplan has included the most widely read, studied, and quoted works of the great philosopher. Informative notes give the reader a convenient and concise review of each work, illuminating the main ideas. Thoughtfully assembled, The Pocket Aristotle is the essential guide to the man who has often been called the world's most important thinker.

WIR #33: The Magicians

The Magicians
Grossman, Lev. The Magicians. New York: Plume. Copyright © 2009 by Lev Grossman.

Lev Grossman on the web:


The blurb:


Quentin Coldwater is brilliant but miserable. A high school math genius, he's secretly fascinated with a series of children's fantasy novels set in a magical land called Fillory, and real life is disappointing by comparison. When Quentin is unexpectedly admitted to an elite, secret college of magic, it looks like his wildest dreams may have come true. But his newfound powers lead him down a rabbit hole of hedonism and disillusionment, and ultimately to the dark secret behind the story of Fillory. The land of his childhood fantasies turns out to be much darker and more dangerous than he ever could have imagined....

The Magicians is one of the most daring and inventive works of literary fantasy in years. No one who has escaped into the worlds of Narnia and Harry Potter should miss this breathtaking return to the landscape of the imagination.